Tracking Creatures of Bavarian Folklore Using a Least-Cost Path Model

Table of Contents

  1. Tracking Creatures of Bavarian Folklore Using a Least-Cost Path Model
  2. Setting up Your Workspace
  3. Preparing the Data
  4. Skill Drill: Geocoding an Address and Creating a CSV Table to Import As XY Data
  5. Skill Drill: Defining the Study Area
  6. Skill Drill: Acquire Elevation Data from the USGS National Map Viewer
  7. Skill Drill: Acquire Land Cover Data from the USGS National Map Viewer
  8. Skill Drill: Acquire Hydrography Data from the USGS National Map Viewer
  9. Changing Global Environment Settings for Raster Processing
  10. Creating Cost Surface Models Using a Relative Cost Scale
  11. Creating a Remap Table to Reclassify Elevation
  12. Skill Drill: Creating a Remap Table to Reclassify Slope
  13. Skill Drill: Creating a Remap Table to Reclassify Tree Canopy Density
  14. Converting the Hydrography Features to Cost Surface Models
  15. Creating a Total Cost Surface Model
  16. Creating a Cost-Distance Surface Model
  17. Creating a Migration Corridor
  18. Determining the Least-Cost Path
  19. Skill Drill: Creating a Map of the Results

Skill Drill: Creating a Map of the Results

You should be familiar with the steps needed to create a map layout of your results. Design a map for use as a figure in a report or summary. Ideally, the map should be designed at a size of approximately 6 or 7 inches wide. Include a north arrow, a scale bar, and a legend. The map should Include the results of each least cost path model along with your migration corridor. Include the den locations and the town of Orick. You may change the color ramp of the migration corridor to one that best communicates your final results. For context, you may also want to add a hillshade under your migration corridor. When your map layout is complete, export the map as a PNG file with a resolution of 300dpi. Save the file in your final folder.

The least-cost paths may be difficult to see because they are only a pixel wide. To improve communication with your map audience, convert the least cost paths into polylines using the Raster to Polyline tool.

An image of the final map
In this map, the dataframe was given a background color of light blue. The color ramp used was a diverging blue to red scheme with yellow representing the mid values. The least-cost path layers were given a contrasting purple color to remain visible against the blue. A hillshade was added to provide context.